“Third world scenes in downtown Funchal”

Calls for dogs to be controlled

Sleeping rough in downtown Funchal

The excellent FN website, reporting from downtown Funchal, continues to fulfil what it describes as “the uncomfortable public service mission” of reporting to the population the reality that is lived in the “Pearl of the Atlantic”.

These images from the website are fresh, from yesterday before midnight in downtown Funchal. “The most touristic zones and central areas of the city are faced with the degrading spectacle of homeless people, chronic alcohol and drug addicts and who sometimes also go berserk and rob or stab someone. Fortunately, as the police authorities reassure us, government officials and social democratic deputies, the situation is properly classified, identified and, it is assumed, controlled”.

By chance the FN reporter, when circulating on the axis of Rua de João de Deus, Fernäo de Ornelas, Rua das Hoffas, and Rua do Carmo in downtown Funchal, “often hears fights, insults, and many are the citizens who tell us about aggression, vandalism, robbery attempts and other Third World portraits”.

Another photo from downtown Funchal

“On the other hand, we don’t know if anyone noticed, but along with the increase in homeless, drug addicts, alcoholics, etc, also increased the number of dogs that they are accompanied by. The ordinary citizen is required to have the full type of identification, vaccination, use of a leash, limitation of the number of animals that you can have at home, etc. To the dogs of the homeless, of course, nothing is required, not even from their “owners”. This situation worsens during the socialist management of the CMF (Câmara Municipal do Funchal – the City Council), which was deaf to our warnings. the new management

The social-democrat seems to be making the man/dog pair more flexible. (in this case, homeless-dog) on ​​the streets of Funchal. But the number of dogs must also be controlled and identified”

FN website, describing downtown Funchal last night

COVID-19 in Madeira: updates can be found in an earlier post

"Third world scenes in downtown Funchal" 1

All the incidental news from Madeira – up to 60 reports per day – is being continually picked up automatically, translated, and instantly posted on our sister website, no matter how trivial

21 thoughts on ““Third world scenes in downtown Funchal””

  1. Could not agree with this article more.
    My wife and I went to the supermarket in the center of Funchal last week and to our disgust spread out on a narrow pavement was a man, judging by his appearance to be both drunk and homeless, further to my disgust was the fact that a police car at that precise moment drove along the road only 1 meter away from him and they done nothing, didn’t even stop to see if the man was alive, it has to be asked why are PSP NOT DOING MORE !!! this incident happened in broad daylight, is this the image the government wants tourists to take home with them? or maybe the powers that be just don’t care as long as the tourist money keeps rolling in.
    But be aware some tourists may not return.

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    • The PSP would have to fill in paper work if they saw anything, drunks, druggies, antisocial behaviour
      (loud music at night), unroadworthy cars, people letting their dogs shit in the street, lots of things AND THEY DON’T WANT TO BE ARSED. They might be late for their pequeno almoco or jantar.
      So do want you want, when you want, if you want and f@ck anybody else here seems to be the motto !!!
      because the Police could NOT give a flying fart.

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  2. Just come back from Funchal been going there for over twenty years now for the first time we felt uncomfortable walking around the old town. I think it’s time for a big clean up if not many people are going to stay away which is not good

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    • I recommend people read this, it’s disturbing. I have been coming since 1968, the video was made in 1999. But it’s a part answer to those who bemoan the modernisation and the push to increase tourism. Yes, back then Madeira had few ugly buildings but a lot of ugly, undercover habits. Please look at it then think, do you really want to go back to how it was.

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  3. Not sure whether the current situation is related to past or present political management….
    I live close to Old Town, Sé and Santa Luzia and can see a high increase of homeless and drug addicted people especially since the pandemic. Only 4 years ago it was common to exchange a boa tarde on your way home in the evening. Never felt unsafe or molested, but to read that Sunday morning a woman was asked for money and then attacked with a knife needs the government to intervene.
    Drug/alcohol addiction are often a cause for theft, violence and unsocial behaviour. More social workers, detox program, job opportunities … what else can be done?

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    • Don’t forget “there but for the grace of god go I” These are real people lost and degraded by society. I have seen a number of them with lovely dogs, and I have chatted to them to ask them to take care of them. These people are lost in a society that doesn’t care. If the government are not willing to do anything to help both the men and the dogs, I can only say it is a very sad world and the tourist should put their hand in their pockets and try to do some good and not complain” “that it spoiled our holiday” Tough, go somewhere else in future.

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  4. The problem of ‘Rough Sleepers’ is universal and the mild winter climate on Madeira makes it an ideal place for them. I used to chair a Rough Sleepers (RS) Forum here in the UK that included local charities, the Police and the Fire Brigade. I know how difficult this problem is and there is no easy answer. The Fire Brigade acted to help RS by handing out made up kits including blankets, torches and bottles of water. They would befriend them and knew their names and places they slept. Sleeping rough is not illegal, and many will not change their life style, even if offered help. The charities run shelters offering a bed for the night with a shower. Many RS have a dog and some charities allow them to bring their dog with them. They will offer extra help such as providing them with clothes and trying to get them a job and permanent accommodation. Also getting them off drugs/alcohol. Despite all of this, the problem still remains, but suggesting the police get involved by arresting a RS is not a solution. Many have mental health issues and they need help not arresting1

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  5. We’re in Funchal at the moment on our normal fortnight holiday and there certainly are a few more rough sleepers here than in previous years however many we recognize as have been here for years. The mild climate certainly makes it relatively safe compared to back in the UK. At a rough guess I would think we have just as many begging and living on the streets of Cambridge . In both locations I do not like being out alone after 11pm without due care and attention. I agree many have mental health issues as there are many charities both in Funchal and UK offering support and chances to work for those who want to be helped but sadly many either do not want help or have mental health problems.

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  6. El Presidente of the Regional Government Miguel Albuquerque, along with the Church should be taking a more proactive action…As it is only going to get worse as more drugs infiltrate the population…Looking at the political makeup of Madeira, for such a small island the seems to be a tad top heavy with the amount of Mayors, Chair of the Municipal Assembly & Chair of the Assembly…along with 17 Political parties and leaders…? That’s a lot of snouts in the trough for the workers who pay the taxes…to support…?

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  7. The term Third World Scenes is not appropriate and is in itself judgemental and dismissive. A permanent task force to engage with, help and support these individuals to get off drugs and back into mainstream society is what is needed. The investment will easily pay dividends both in improving the lot of these individuals and also by maintaining Madeira as a place that tourists will want to keep visiting. Calling for punitive action or simply whinging about police inaction or what it looks like for tourists simply won’t do.

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  8. Surely it’s now recognised that addicts are ill and need treatment and support. Is there any rehab available in Funchal or is that just a daft question? The issue of the dogs also needs addressed. Sometimes these animals are the only love and companionship these poor folk have which in itself indicates the depth of the problem.

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  9. Complete agree with everything . After living so many years in UK complete choke in Portugal that some people use their dogs in their properties a way of intimidation for people no to walk in the streets and this isn’t right or correct. Where I live in Sintra in a street with only houses and gardens and walls and porch’s and gates. Many of them have have their porch’ s very low and the dogs can put their heads out and bite people when walking in the pavement like happen in my street . Complete out of control

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