Airlines mount legal challenge to quarantine

Bid to overturn quarantine by big three airlines

Airlines mount legal challenge to quarantine 1

Various sources report that Britain’s three biggest airlines have started joint legal proceedings against the government in a bid to overturn quarantine rules due to take effect in the UK from tomorrow.

IAG, parent company of BA, along with Ryanair and easyJet, have sent a pre-action protocol letter setting out why they believe the moves, which will force air passengers arriving from abroad to self-isolate for 14 days, are both illogical and unfair. The three airlines also expressed their frustration that there is effectively a ban on people coming here from countries with a lower R – or coronavirus reproduction – rate. This would include Madeira, but possibly not Portugal – see earlier post

Airlines and travel firms have protested in vain against the new Home Office-led regulations, which they have said come months late to stop the transmission of coronavirus and will kill off any nascent recovery in their industries. The aviation sector says the rules will “close down Britain” if they stand and a legal letter sent to ministers on Friday points out that the measure is harsher than that imposed on those who test positive, who must isolate for just seven days.

The letter is the first step in an application for judicial review. A Ryanair spokesperson, commenting on behalf of the three airlines, said: “These measures are disproportionate and unfair on British citizens as well as international visitors arriving in the UK. We urge the government to remove this ineffective visitor quarantine which will have a devastating effect on UK’s tourism industry and will destroy even more thousands of jobs in this unprecedented crisis”. The letter says the Government has failed to “identify a valid justification for the blanket nature” of the regulations.

1 thought on “Airlines mount legal challenge to quarantine”

  1. Re: “ there is effectively a ban on people coming here from countries with a lower R – or coronavirus reproduction – rate. This would include Madeira, but possibly not Portugal”

    The ban would still include Madeira as it is not a country. (So despite Madeira having a lower R, if the definition is R per country …)

    Reply

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