Jellyfish alert

High concentration of jellyfish in Madeiran waters

JellyfishJM reports online that the Regional Directorate for the Environment and Climate Change published this afternoon a warning for the large presence of jellyfish in the waters of Madeira.

They state that jellyfish have “tentacles with a potentially stinging and dangerous poison” and account for the care to be taken in the first aid: “Do not rub the affected area; Do not wash with freshwater or alcohol; do not apply compresses; wash with seawater and carefully remove, using gloves, any tentacles glued to the skin; apply baking soda mixed in equal parts with seawater; in the case of the Portuguese caravel, instead of water with baking soda, apply vinegar ”.

Local reports say that Praia Formosa this afternoon was experiencing the phenomenon, discouraging bathers from entering the sea.

6 thoughts on “Jellyfish alert”

  1. The are not jellyfish, they are known as Portuguese Man-of-war

    From National Geogrsphic–
    “Anyone unfamiliar with the biology of the venomous Portuguese man-of-war would likely mistake it for a jellyfish. Not only is it not a jellyfish, it’s not even an “it,” but a “they.” The Portuguese man-of-war is a siphonophore, an animal made up of a colony of organisms working together.

    The tentacles are the man-of-war’s second organism. These long, thin tendrils can extend 165 feet in length below the surface, although 30 feet is more the average. They are covered in venom-filled nematocysts used to paralyze and kill fish and other small creatures. For humans, a man-of-war sting is excruciatingly painful, but rarely deadly. But beware—even dead man-of-wars washed up on shore can deliver a sting.

    Muscles in the tentacles draw prey up to a polyp containing the gastrozooids or digestive organisms. A fourth polyp contains the reproductive organisms.”

    Reply
    • Ronan, did you read my comment?

      The are not jellyfish, they are known as Portuguese Man-of-war.
      Not only is it not a jellyfish, it’s not even an “it,” but a “they.” The Portuguese man-of-war is a siphonophore, an animal made up of a colony of organisms working together.

      Reply
  2. Another blog here has an account of jellyfish/Portuguese Man o’ War “biting” swimmers at Praia Formosa yesterday. Not only is there confusion over their exact identity, but they now seem to have grown teeth!

    Reply

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