Madeira elections 2011 in graphics and images

Madeira News from Paul Abbiati:

Madeira elections 2011 in graphics and images

“The election was again victory for Alberto João Jardim, Madeira’s leader for more than three decades after on this occasion getting a less-than-50% majority. This was the smallest majority in these elections in 33 years.”

images from Diario Newspaper

link http://www.dnoticias.pt/multimedia/fotoreportagem/287011-eleicoes-regionais-2011

Graphics from Diario Newspaper

16 thoughts on “Madeira elections 2011 in graphics and images”

  1. Less than 50% of people voted, less than 50% voted for Bertie —- so, only 23% or so of the population voted for him. In other words more than three quarters of the Madeiran people DID NOT VOTE FOR BERTIE – apathy, dislike or no faith in other parties? Don’t know but surely had more people voted, he would NOT have won.

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  2. Jon Thank you for your kind comment. Think world wide Politics and news papers like to use fear and control people with politics and to sell news papers. Its up to the people to see past it and make changes world wide.

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  3. The Central Bank of Portugal warned the economy might fail to meet budget deficit targets set for this year and next under the EU/IMF programme (5.9% and 4.5% of GDP, respectively), unless it takes “significant additional measures”.

    Contraction Two More Years

    According to the report, lower-than-previously projected GDP growth and lack of implementation of structural reforms (as opposed to one-off actions) would be responsible for the anticipated fiscal slippage in 2012. The Central Bank expects GDP growth to contract 1.9% this year (BarCap: -2.0%, EU/IMF: -2.0%) and 2.2% next (previous forecast: 1.9%, BarCap: -1.7%, EU/IMF: -1.8%).

    FM Cavaco Silva had also warned that Portugal needs “tough and relentless budget discipline” adding that a failure to control public spending and introduce reforms might trigger the request of additional support, the FT reports this morning.

    In September, the ‘troika’ (EU, ECB, IMF) identified a potential fiscal slippage of 1.3pp of GDP due in part to to the electoral cycle. Later, hidden debt in the Madeira region (worth 0.3% of GDP) was also disclosed.

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  4. «Banks furious for having to pay for troika inspections», reports Jornal de Negócios, stating that eight major Portuguese banks will be forced to pay €16m to auditors who will scrutinise their assets. According to Jornal de Negócios, the banks were unaware they would be footing the bill for the audits requested by the bailout troika.

    this is classical rip off by the big sharks

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  5. Vic, and I thought that we lived in a democracy …. tut tut, you sound like uncle Bertie!

    Of course (and I am sure that you understand this) us “immigrants” (who historicaly introduced ALL the trade to make Madeira wealthy, in days gone by and secured the platform for future economic growth here AND defended your Island against many foes) had to have a MEANS test when we arrived, not to mention health checks etc – so that we would only have a POSITIVE effect on the economy – if we all left and took our PROVEN positive fiscal status with us, I wonder what the effect would be? ….not so much a common market here but more of a selective, blinkered, self protective and predujiced closed regime with Bertie at the helm…..

    PLUS, many of us (with our love of Madeira and it’s peoples) have (despite huge prejudice from official {PSD} bodies) generated fiscal growth for local business and peoples – AND are fully integrated into the local community ….

    Sorry mate, but we are here to stay and to exercise our right to vote as residents, to continue paying our taxes, to help the economy and to educate the masses against a corrupt regime that is long overdue for a change……for the better of the Island.

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  6. Well what can you say – make the vote obligatory then you will have a true vote as in Belgium – now is that a good example – there lies the question – I think two years without a Government and it works! Belies belief – The only thing I will say is that you hear this and that on the rumour machine and if he has big problems then he made them and he is back to mend them. People cannot moan about the election if they could not be bothered to vote. Sorry but that is what it boils down to. I still love Madeira and am happy living here and as the old British saying goes ‘Better the devil you know than the one you don’t”.

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  7. If my comment helps. Many years ago I had many holidays in Malta. On one occasion I was talking to one of the member of the staff in the hotel. She was talking about Malta past when the Brits were there, to the time the Brits was left Malta and they was a strong anti feeling. The government pushed up taxes and within the short time, what Brits was there left. Leaving small loyal quantity left struggling. The Island quality of life dropped because tax revenue etc. Within a few more years the Islanders and Government realised they can´t live out the Brits and decided to lower the taxes and put there feeling aside. Malta was also remembered what the Brits has helped them in the past history. Today in Madeira when I talked to local Brits I asked them what is the number one reason why Brits leave the island in good times and bad times? The number one reply was MONEY MONEY MONEY. Which took me little by surprise. Madeira should learn from Malta past, and work together. Everyone has an input large as well as small into an islands life, and don’t let your feelings get in the way. Hope my comment helps everyone.

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  8. jon: it’s not who votes but who counts the votes… i heard that somewhere.

    regards tlc

    vic: nice comeback; how about a real attempt at constructive argument. like; maybe you can show how ajj has helped the people of madeira through his 30yrs in office etc…

    regards tlc

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